“Stop worrying about the potholes in the road and enjoy the journey.”

The spellbinding Spiti Valley, located in Himachal Pradesh in India, is often proclaimed by those who see it to be a world within a world. It’s a mountainous cold desert freckled with green patches over a dry weather-beaten face, fascinating valleys, windswept landscapes, and quiet villages.

The term Spiti means ‘The Middle Land’, as Spiti Valley separates India from Tibet. Scantily populated, Spiti is an adventure lover’s paradise, with several trekking trails that tourists can choose from.

For centuries, Spiti has had an introversive culture where life remained focused around its monasteries. It was loosely ruled by hereditary waziers, a self-styled ‘Nono’, and in between for brief periods, the valley was also attacked by invaders from neighboring kingdoms.

After many years, East India Company took control of Spiti in 1846 after cessation of cis-Sutlej states on the conclusion of the First Anglo-Sikh War. On the ground, nothing changed and the Nono of Kyuling continued to rule as the hereditary Wizier of Spiti.

In the last two decades, tourism has caught up fast in the valley that stayed in hides for so long, thanks to the surreal moonscapes, scenic Himalayan lakes, and the harsh highlands nourished by prayers at thousand-old monasteries that overlook the grey ribbon of the Spiti river.

Situated at an altitude of around 12,500 ft above sea level, the barren mountains over here change their hues every second and it is a sight to behold. Wherever you go, you’ll witness beautiful Buddhist monasteries, prayer flags fluttering in the air and a large number of monks praying with their prayer wheels.

One can also have a fascinating glimpse of Dhadkan and Chandratal lake here. The awe-inspiring passes like Kunzum and Baralacha la pass will further take you at the top of the world with its immense altitude.

A slice of moon landed on earth that drape travelers in its pristine beauty in a way leaving them soulful but never satisfied, such is the charm of Spiti. With the thick Himalayan snow cutting Spiti off from the rest of the country for around 6 months a year, the summer months are the only time Spiti is directly accessible via motorway. For your next plans in the summer, get on a winding road leading to the highest motorable village of Komic or a narrow trail in the rugged terrain well-accompanied by stunning landscapes on all sides, and experience the untamed land of solitude and spiritualism first-hand.
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