Hey, Do you know what are supplements?

Supplements are manmade products based on highly concentrated, isolated nutrients. They can be made of either synthetic or natural ingredients.

Supplements are not actually required if you are not planning to put on serious muscle mass or pursue competitive bodybuilding as a career. If you’re generally healthy and eat a wide variety of foods, including fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, low-fat dairy products, lean meats and fish, you likely don’t need supplements.

Generally supplements are required if:

  • Don’t eat well or consume fewer calories than needed
  • Are a vegan or a vegetarian who eats a limited variety of foods
  • Follow any other type of diet that restricts an entire category of foods
  • Don’t obtain two to three servings a week of seafood, which supplies omega-3 fatty acids for heart health
  • Have limited milk intake due to lactose intolerance or milk allergy, or simply don’t consume enough dairy foods
  • Have heavy bleeding during your menstrual period
  • Have a medical condition that affects how your body absorbs or uses nutrients, such as chronic diarrhoea, food allergies, food intolerance, or a disease of the liver, gallbladder, intestines or pancreas
  • Have had surgery on your digestive tract and are not able to digest and absorb nutrients properly.

Supplements aren’t intended to substitute for food. They can’t replicate all of the nutrients and benefits of whole foods, such as fruits and vegetables. Whole foods offer three main benefits over dietary supplements:

Greater nutrition. Whole foods are complex, containing a variety of the micronutrients your body needs.

Essential fiber. Whole foods, such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes, provide dietary fiber. As part of a healthy diet, fiber can help prevent certain diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease, and it can also help manage constipation.

Protective substances. Many whole foods are also good sources of antioxidants — substances that slow down a natural process leading to cell and tissue damage. It isn’t clear that antioxidant supplements offer the same benefits as antioxidants in food. Some high-dose antioxidant supplements have been associated with health risks.

Supplements generally helps :

  • If you require greater endurance.
  • If you require greater energy supply.
  • If you’ve to put on greater muscle mass.
  • If you want greater intra-workout energy.
  • If you can’t meet your daily calorie intake (macros).
  • If you don’t feel energetic before workout.
  • If you want to put on or gain weight.

Supplements aren’t harmful normally, but you must choose and have supplements by keeping some things in mind:

  • Talk to your doctor or consult your physician/trainer. Supplements can cause harmful effects if taken in certain combinations, with certain prescription medications or before surgery or other medical procedures.
  • Check the label. Product labels can tell you what the active ingredient or ingredients are, which nutrients are included, the serving size and the amount of nutrients in each serving.
  • Watch what you eat. Vitamins and minerals are being added to a growing number of foods, including breakfast cereals and beverages. If you’re also taking supplements, you may be getting more than you realize of certain nutrients. Taking more than you need is expensive and can raise your risk of side effects.
  • Avoid mega doses. Taking more than the recommended daily values (DVs) can increase your risk of side effects. Children are especially vulnerable to overdoses of vitamins and minerals.

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